Become A Member | Forum | Profiles | Personals | Classifieds | See Who's Online ...
 
View Topic
  Message Boards : Coming Out : View Topic : 51 Posts, Page 2 of 4
  HomeNewNoticesHot TopicsPollsStatsBlogs Login / Register
 
Musings On The Neccessity Of A Sub Culture
 
# 16 : Wednesday 2-11-2011 @ 15:16
 
 
Lots of interesting points!
Reply
 
 Recent Message Board Topics
Non Random Thoughts..
The Moral Cesspit That Is Hollywood
Brexit
Where Is A Good Place To Find Like Minded Curious Guys?
Helping Me With The
Black Friday
Crossdressing Text Chat
Eurovision Song Contest 2018
 
Hey! If you enjoy shooting the breeze with like-minded people, check out
our Message Boards
• Advice • Coming Out
• Computers • Current Affairs
• Discussion • Food & Drink
• Going Out • Humour
• Health • Music
• Newbies • Sexual Issues
# 17 : Wednesday 2-11-2011 @ 18:38
 
 
Someone said :
Imagine a world where you're having a night out and you spot someone. You lean to one of your friends and say "is that John chap over there gay do you know?" "who him?" the friend leans to another friend mutters a question then returns "yeah Stacy is friends with him and knows for sure he's gay" "great" and off you go.

My friends do this all the time. I kinda just assumed other people's friends do it as well. If I'm heading to a house party where I don't know the majority of people, my friends have given me the heads up. Or the anti-heads up so I don't flirt with someone for a half an hour before finding out she's straight/in a relationship. I love them for it because it really works
Maybe it's an age thing but it's hardly rare. Most people I know seem ok with talking about who they think is hot/not, regardless of orientation. I found out via a third party that someone thought I was cute at the last party but she never made a move. So obviously I'm not the only one doing it.
Reply
 
# 18 : Thursday 3-11-2011 @ 01:32
 
 
My friends are just as free, as are workmates. It can be fun and a time saver. Also get asked to assess anyone new at work...
Reply
 
# 19 : Monday 7-11-2011 @ 17:11
 
 
Is a sub-culture not a matter of fact, as opposed to some kind of policy implemented by the mystery "them"?
It is necessary as long as it is.
When it no longer is, then it is no longer... a necessity.

But we cannot do away with it just by wishing it away.

As long as we are not an objective victim of that sub-culture, what does it matter if it exists?
Reply
 
# 20 : Tuesday 8-11-2011 @ 00:03
 
 
Subcultures are cool,i am involved in many,goth,metal,industrial,republicanism,the left wing,the occult,art groups,weird independent films etc,the only groups i am`nt involved with are straight and gay mainstream bullshit,how very fucking boring,i pull when i want and throw away afterwards like and old rag,hail misantrophy
Reply
 
# 21 : Tuesday 8-11-2011 @ 00:15
 
 
Someone said :
Subcultures are cool,i am involved in many,goth,metal,industrial,republicanism,the left wing,the occult,art groups,weird independent films etc,the only groups i am`nt involved with are straight and gay mainstream bullshit,how very fucking boring,i pull when i want and throw away afterwards like and old rag,hail misantrophy

I have to ask................what are you like in bed?
Reply
 
# 22 : Tuesday 8-11-2011 @ 00:19
 
 
Someone said :

I have to ask................what are you like in bed?

Different
Reply
 
# 23 : Tuesday 8-11-2011 @ 00:28
 
 
*shudders*
Reply
 
# 24 : Tuesday 8-11-2011 @ 00:31
 
 
There should be a culture of subs if only to cater to the doms
Reply
 
# 25 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 14:13
 
 
BOUNCING THIS THREAD

Two things prompt it. One is that my annual dose of gay culture (in another meaning of culture from Greenmanpp's in the o.p.) is coming up at the end of the month with the Dublin GAZE film festival.

The other is that I was looking at the findings about Ireland under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and following links and points, ended up doing some searching to find our what 'cultural rights' means. That led me to this page at the UN's human rights site (which is a massive site!): http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/Download. etc ...

The document at that link makes clear that cultural rights include ways of life, rites, ceremonies, customs and traditions, etc., and not just the 'high culture' of the mainstream or dominant group in a society.

So it seems that culture in the meaning Greenmanpp asked about, in a broad way if not the specific examples he asked about, could be protected by international human rights law. However, there is nothing in the document I linked to about lgb communities' cultures, but equally nothing to exclude them. The way it is written suggests that what the committee had in mind was the likes of ethnic minorities or indigenous peoples.

So, what in our lgb cultures would be worth protecting?

Indeed, is gay culture a temporary phenomenon because we have had to come from criminality, through anti-dicrimination, to marriage equality, and is it something that will fade as a distinct 'identity' or culture in the next decades and century, and become as significant as being left-handed or red-haired?


Reply
 
# 26 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 14:59
 
 
I think minorities sortof gravitate to environments where they are not a minority.
ReplyWebsite
 
# 27 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 16:43
 
 
Someone said :
I think minorities sortof gravitate to environments where they are not a minority.

But do they do so consciously?
like, are you saying people intentionally or unintentionally "herd" themselves?
Reply
 
# 28 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 16:59
 
 
Someone said :

But do they do so consciously?
like, are you saying people intentionally or unintentionally "herd" themselves?

I think some do yes. However I don't think bisexuals do so as much, because they can very easily assimilate into either culture. While I'm not saying they don't exist, I have never met a stereotypically "gay" bisexual man. The ones I've met are ones you'd never guess were into fellos.

I recently read of some decades old American research that indicated that in adolescences, one third of straight men and one half of gay men exhibited behaviour that was not stereotypically masculine (I think I fit that category). I think based on this I would say that in homophobic environments where gay men were bullied for not being 'butch' (and I accept there are some butch gay men too), that the urge to commune with other gay men of like mind may be stronger. But that is just speculation on my part.

After all the most vulnerable minorities are the visible one. Black people are vulnerable to racism based on their skin colour. Effeminate gay men are the most vulnerable to homophobia because of the stereotypes surrounding them. But in environments where there are more of us, we don't fear discrimination as much, and hence tend to (as you say) "herd" there.
ReplyWebsite
 
# 29 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 17:30
 
 
But entertaining your ideas, there is another aspect you may not be considering.

Any and all bisexual men you've met may have simply been playing "the game of fitting in" and banking on the more numerous, and less challenging straight tribe.

They may believe there is no reason for them to be honest with you because you are not bisexual, and the same goes for the straight groups too. Only, it's from the straight group rather then the gay ones that they accept their "social provisional licence" nine times out of ten and as a gay man you mistake this for the law that "all bisexual men behave straight".


For all I/you/we know, being bisexual might feel like you can easily emulate fitting in to both groups, becasue of what those groups assume about you. But it's only other actual bisexual folk who understand what it's really like, therefore, they only bother to show their true selves to those people.
That in all other contexts it's just easier to assume the "almost correct but not" version of themselves either side of the fence (straight/gay) hands them by default, rather then spend their whole time splitting hairs with everyone who isn't Bi.


Reply
 
# 30 : Saturday 11-7-2015 @ 17:34
 
 
Someone said :
But entertaining your ideas, there is another aspect you may not be considering.

Any and all bisexual men you've met may have simply been playing "the game of fitting in" and banking on the more numerous, and less challenging straight tribe.

They may believe there is no reason for them to be honest with you because you are not bisexual, and the same goes for the straight groups too. Only, it's from the straight group rather then the gay ones that they accept their "social provisional licence" nine times out of ten and as a gay man you mistake this for the law that "all bisexual men behave straight".


For all I/you/we know, being bisexual might feel like you can easily emulate fitting in to both groups, becasue of what those groups assume about you. But it's only other actual bisexual folk who understand what it's really like, therefore, they only bother to show their true selves to those people. That in all other contexts it's just easier to assume the "almost correct but not" version of themselves either side of the fence (straight/gay) hands them by default, rather then spend their whole time splitting hairs with everyone who isn't Bi.

Well the bisexual men I've known all had girlfriends or were married to women at the time. Streetfighter is the only exception.
ReplyWebsite
 
Prev 1234Next