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Brexit
 
# 31 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 13:34
 
 
57% of the UK's trade is with the EU. That could disappear overnight and they won't survive on their domestic market alone.
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# 32 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 13:43
 
 
Someone said :
57% of the UK's trade is with the EU. That could disappear overnight and they won't survive on their domestic market alone.

I don't think the trade will dry up though it may reduce. A market of 60 million is too lucrative for businesses in the EU to ignore. The English language is also a plus. What might hurt is if the EU imposed tariff barriers it would depend how heavy they were.

I don't think the UK will be alone if it leaves. The Czech PM has said if it happens his country could vote on Czexit. There's a growing east-west divide in the EU.
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# 33 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 13:44
 
 
Someone said :
57% of the UK's trade is with the EU. That could disappear overnight and they won't survive on their domestic market alone.

It'll be a few years before they actually leave and there isn't a chance in hell that trade agreements won't be signed by then, even if it means them being a pseudo-member.
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# 34 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 13:59
 
 
I travel and work between Britain and Ireland, nearly every newspaper in the UK apart from the Guardian is anti E.U they blame Europe for everything that goes wrong, the main sticking points are majority of people in all parts of the Uk are worried about immigration and the effect thgs is having on Local Councils, school, and social services and because of media anti E.U i feel the prevailing settlemt is to vote to leave, and set up trade agreements with the E.U and other countries, i know various polls have got a very slim majority to stay in the E.U. At most local elections people vote against the Government to teach them a lesson the fear now is that this could happen again. The Labour leader is refusing to nail his colurs to the mast and just as many labour as Conservative M.P's want to leave the E.U but my own hopes from my friends in many parts of the Uk is that Britain remains in the E.U but it could go either way.
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# 35 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 14:00
 
 
I heard though on BBC news years ago that two thirds of the UK economy is consumer spending . I would also add that their percentage of trade with the EU has declined from 66% in 1999 to around 57% now.
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# 36 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 16:32
 
 
The office of budget responsibility ( an independent body) announced the day before the last budget this year that the Uk Britain is forecast by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to be the fastest growing major advanced economy this year. With employment at a record rate of 74.1%. But the challenges the country faces are growing As a result, the deficit at 3.8% is forecast to be down by almost two thirds from its peak, bank capital ratios have doubled and there are over 2 million new jobs since 2010.Public sector current receipts are expected to be around £716 billion in 2016-17.The OBR predicts the UK’s strong labour market performance to continue. The OBR revised up its forecast for employment in 2016 from 31.5 million to 31.6 million, and in 2017 employment reaches 31.7 million. The OBR forecast employment to rise by 0.9 million by 2020, meaning that employment will have risen by 3 million since 2010. Wages and salaries are forecast to grow faster than inflation, rising by 3.6% in 2016, and thereafter by an average of 4.0% until 2020. The OBR forecasts CPI inflation to be below the 2.0% target in 2016 before returning to target in 2018.
The long-term economic plan has delivered considerable economic gains since 2010. The UK was the fastest growing major advanced economy in 2014, the second fastest in 2015 and the OECD forecast the UK to be the fastest growing in 2016.Government action to reward work and reform benefits has delivered a stronger labour market in the UK, with an employment rate that has risen faster in the UK than in any other G7 country since 2010 making progress towards the government’s goal of full employment
Britain’s economy is set to power ahead this year – leaving the crisis-torn eurozone trailing in its wake, a major study has found.

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# 37 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 16:58
 
 
Fuck it! We should leave if they do!
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# 38 : Monday 11-4-2016 @ 17:59
 
 
Someone said :
It'll be a few years before they actually leave and there isn't a chance in hell that trade agreements won't be signed by then, even if it means them being a pseudo-member.

So they will pay but have no say? I think that's just a poor deal. I have yet to see a good argument for leaving put forward by any Brexit campaigners.
Reply
 
# 39 : Wednesday 13-4-2016 @ 00:57
 
 
Someone said :
The office of budget responsibility ( an independent body) announced the day before the last budget this year that the Uk Britain is forecast by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to be the fastest growing major advanced economy this year. With employment at a record rate of 74.1%. But the challenges the country faces are growing As a result, the deficit at 3.8% is forecast to be down by almost two thirds from its peak, bank capital ratios have doubled and there are over 2 million new jobs since 2010.Public sector current receipts are expected to be around £716 billion in 2016-17.The OBR predicts the UK’s strong labour market performance to continue. The OBR revised up its forecast for employment in 2016 from 31.5 million to 31.6 million, and in 2017 employment reaches 31.7 million. The OBR forecast employment to rise by 0.9 million by 2020, meaning that employment will have risen by 3 million since 2010. Wages and salaries are forecast to grow faster than inflation, rising by 3.6% in 2016, and thereafter by an average of 4.0% until 2020. The OBR forecasts CPI inflation to be below the 2.0% target in 2016 before returning to target in 2018.
The long-term economic plan has delivered considerable economic gains since 2010. The UK was the fastest growing major advanced economy in 2014, the second fastest in 2015 and the OECD forecast the UK to be the fastest growing in 2016.Government action to reward work and reform benefits has delivered a stronger labour market in the UK, with an employment rate that has risen faster in the UK than in any other G7 country since 2010 making progress towards the government’s goal of full employment
Britain’s economy is set to power ahead this year – leaving the crisis-torn eurozone trailing in its wake, a major study has found.

[/QUOTE

That's as a member of the eu , as their currency tail spins to who knows what value just questioning that membership and the euro isn't falling in value btw , I think nobody reckons it's a good place to keep money .

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# 40 : Wednesday 13-4-2016 @ 01:13
 
 
If they vote to leave , which is their right , it will be ironic if they lose all of their opt outs , have to accept free movement, have to pay anyway , come under the jurisdiction of the ECJ all to join up to the European economic area ,
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# 41 : Wednesday 13-4-2016 @ 13:46
 
 
How do you know they would have to accept free movement?

They used to have a huge empire. I think they can survive on their own. Maybe work out a trade agreement with the Commonwealth.
Reply
 
# 42 : Wednesday 13-4-2016 @ 14:24
 
 
If that want to go let them off if I British I would probably veto to leave we should have one too
Reply
 
# 43 : Sunday 17-4-2016 @ 11:15
 
 
Someone said :
I travel and work between Britain and Ireland, nearly every newspaper in the UK apart from the Guardian is anti E.U they blame Europe for everything that goes wrong, the main sticking points are majority of people in all parts of the Uk are worried about immigration and the effect thgs is having on Local Councils, school, and social services and because of media anti E.U i feel the prevailing settlemt is to vote to leave, and set up trade agreements with the E.U and other countries, i know various polls have got a very slim majority to stay in the E.U. At most local elections people vote against the Government to teach them a lesson the fear now is that this could happen again. The Labour leader is refusing to nail his colurs to the mast and just as many labour as Conservative M.P's want to leave the E.U but my own hopes from my friends in many parts of the Uk is that Britain remains in the E.U but it could go either way.

There are more immigrants from outside the EU than from the EU , 2.9million against 1.7 , all together that makes 4.6 in a population of 60 million , is the real problem austerity and a biased press using targeting techniques to blame poles and Romanians and Bulgarians for taking limited resources to divert attention from the government taking away the resources in the first place ?
Why aren't the non eu immigrants targeted with the same levels of attention for competing for jobs resources housing healthcare etc there are 2.9 million of them and a country that wants to control its borders can surely control their numbers?
What's the issue there ? Why isn't it reported and why all the focus on eu nationals who are less numerous?
Reply
 
# 44 : Sunday 17-4-2016 @ 11:52
 
 
Someone said :
How do you know they would have to accept free movement?

They used to have a huge empire. I think they can survive on their own. Maybe work out a trade agreement with the Commonwealth.

Perhaps we should join the commonwealth. I lived in a Crown Dependency that was doing very nicely for itself. Not just economically - but had an extraordinary level of economic equality. Every year it made a single large transfer to the Crown - which involved a ceremony, but it was substantial.
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# 45 : Sunday 17-4-2016 @ 14:01
 
 
No thanks.
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