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How Will The New Caighdeán Oifigiúil Change Your Life?
 
# 1 : Thursday 14-7-2016 @ 09:28
 
 
Great news: simplification of some grammatical rules, regarding numbers, initial letter changes.
This standard is defining the rules of the artificial "Córas Lárnach", a standardized Irish to make it possible to learn it and agree on official rules without having to be born in the family of the ones making the rules.

Main changes:
- Counting will become simpler over 20.
- The úru will be allowed after sa and den. (Standard remains the Séimhiú though)

Of course you can still stick with the older official rules, or the regional variations. It simply means that for the exams, students will not be penalized as much for not knowing complex rules that may have lost their appeal.

Article about it:
http://www.rte.ie/news/nuacht/2016/0713/802248-eagran-nua-de-chai etc ...

Download the new version:
http://www.oireachtas.ie/parliament/about/rannoganaistriuchain/an etc ...
(In Irish, as it should be...)
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# 2 : Thursday 14-7-2016 @ 17:03
 
 
I miss the bulta
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# 3 : Monday 18-7-2016 @ 21:39
 
 
This is the gayest Caighdeán every. It is the "Caighdeán Ildaite", named after the iridescent/colorfulness of the book covering.

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# 4 : Tuesday 19-7-2016 @ 23:01
 
 
I can feel my life changing already, changing utterly.
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# 5 : Tuesday 19-7-2016 @ 23:05
 
 
Someone said :
I can feel my life changing already.

Are you sure that was what you just felt?
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# 6 : Tuesday 19-7-2016 @ 23:08
 
 
It's all because of this terrible news that the uru's are making a comeback, like some ghastly girl band from the ninties.
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# 7 : Wednesday 20-7-2016 @ 06:48
 
 
Someone said :
It's all because of this terrible news that the uru's are making a comeback, like some ghastly girl band from the ninties.

There seems to have been a re-balancing in favor of the "Ulster" forms, and as a result, some Munster forms seem to have gone. As you can expect not everyone happy with that!
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# 8 : Wednesday 20-7-2016 @ 07:56
 
 
They should stop teaching Ulster, Munster,
Galway Irish, only teach standardised Irish in school.
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# 9 : Wednesday 20-7-2016 @ 18:30
 
 
Someone said :
They should stop teaching Ulster, Munster,
Galway Irish, only teach standardised Irish in school.

That would make no sense.
We are not in France where the linguistic minorities were squashed, physically.

If you start telling children in the Gaeltacht that the Irish they speak at home is no good, because someone in Dublin said so, how engaged do you think they will be?
And when you send kids to the Gaeltacht on holidays, how impressed do you think will the locals be to have their "Irish corrected" by spotty know-it-all teenagers?

The Standard is not saying local Irish are wrong.
It is just agreeing to a standard for the State to use.
But it considers the natural Irish as a foundation that should not be forced to adopt the Standard.
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# 10 : Wednesday 20-7-2016 @ 19:37
 
 
Well I don't think making kids in Dublin learn Munster Irish or kids in Cork learn Ulster Irish makes any sense, If Irish was standardised like in France or Germany allot more people would speak it.

I'm not saying that how people speak should change, but people living in Scotland are not thought to speak English in a Scottish accent but they still speak in accent.

Until it is standardised it will remain a dead language.

I think it's ridiculous to ask children in Dublin to learn Ulster/Munster/Western Irish.
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# 11 : Wednesday 20-7-2016 @ 19:37
 
 
Well I don't think making kids in Dublin learn Munster Irish or kids in Cork learn Ulster Irish makes any sense, If Irish was standardised like in France or Germany allot more people would speak it.

Until it is standardised it will remain a dead language.
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# 12 : Thursday 21-7-2016 @ 08:13
 
 
Someone said :
Well I don't think making kids in Dublin learn Munster Irish or kids in Cork learn Ulster Irish makes any sense, If Irish was standardised like in France or Germany allot more people would speak it.

Until it is standardised it will remain a dead language.

You have to strike a balance between a standardized language and an artificial one.
You will kill it more surely by making it too artificial: how do you pick features that are not "regional" at all?

The only truly "neutral" Irish would be Esperanto!
No one would be born in it, it would be taught as Latin is/was: a dead entity used for administrative purposes.
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