Become A Member | Forum | Profiles | Personals | Classifieds | See Who's Online ...
 
View Topic
  Message Boards : Travel : View Topic : 16 Posts, Page 1 of 2
  HomeNewNoticesHot TopicsPollsStatsBlogs Login / Register
 
Anyone Ever Been To Belarus?
 
# 1 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 10:13
 
 
Anyone ever been to Belarus?

Any recommendations? Minsk?

What is it like as a country to visit? I've read things online but would be interested to see what your personal experiences were.

Thanks.
Reply
 
 Recent Message Board Topics
Catholicism
A Movie For Christmas
The Right Wayto Do Anal First Time
Where To Go In Cork
What Song Are You Listening To Now?!?!
Do You Believe In Alien Life..?
Random Thoughts 21 : Think Fast
Ireland's Abortion Referendum 2018
 
Hey! If you enjoy shooting the breeze with like-minded people, check out
our Message Boards
• Advice • Coming Out
• Computers • Current Affairs
• Discussion • Food & Drink
• Going Out • Humour
• Health • Music
• Newbies • Sexual Issues
# 2 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 12:18
 
 
A friend of mine just came back and he really liked it. His photos look great. You can only stay in the country for 5 days visa free including the days of your arrival and departure and you must arrive at Minsk airport.

I'd order a lonely planet guide if I was you.
Reply
 
# 3 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 12:27
 
 
Thanks for the heads up.
Reply
 
# 4 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 13:13
 
 
You could fly into Vilnius, Lithuania for a couple of days then fly to Minsk. It's only a 35 minute flight. Vilnius is a lovely city.
Reply
 
# 5 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 18:55
 
 
Someone said :
Anyone ever been to Belarus?

Any recommendations? Minsk?

What is it like as a country to visit? I've read things online but would be interested to see what your personal experiences were.

Thanks.

Haven't been, and won't go: it's the only European country to both retain and implement the death penalty: http://www.osce.org/odihr/315931

I would urge you to reconsider spending tourist money in such a country.
Reply
 
# 6 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 22:20
 
 
You've never been to a country with a death penalty or you have with a "but"?
Reply
 
# 7 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 23:31
 
 
Someone said :
You've never been to a country with a death penalty or you have with a "but"?

not since I was 18. The only but unlikely 'but' would be if I were going for work to promote human rights.
Reply
 
# 8 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 23:34
 
 
Not even to the US?
Reply
 
# 9 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 23:37
 
 
Someone said :
Not even to the US?

Not even. (That's where I was when I was 18.)
Reply
 
# 10 : Tuesday 16-5-2017 @ 23:48
 
 
Ok, I get where you are coming from, re. this subject.
Reply
 
# 11 : Wednesday 17-5-2017 @ 00:51
 
 
Weren't you in Mali before they got rid of their death penalty?
Reply
 
# 12 : Wednesday 17-5-2017 @ 09:42
 
 
Here's a link to an interesting article which questions the policy of boycotting countries that have the death penalty, when considering holiday destinations.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/17/why-i-wont-b etc ...

Part of the article
I found myself wondering if Brits and Americans boycotting Australia as a protest to successive government treatment of our Indigenous people would have an effect on policy. And then I think of what the country would lose if that actually happened.

National stereotypes are made and moulded abroad. They’re a shortcut to understanding and by their nature are hackneyed and generalised.

By visiting Australia, tourists from all over the world realise that not all Australians are racist and not all our politicians are cut from the same cloth as Sir Les Patterson (although in the current political climate the attempt to rid ourselves of that particular stereotype is proving difficult).

Still the best way to discover the nuance in national cultures is to visit those countries and interact with local people.

People travel for all kinds of reasons. Some just want a beach holiday in a resort that serves food they already know where the beers are cheap and the hospitality friendly. They really wouldn’t leave home but these developing countries are so much cheaper – with guaranteed sunshine.

But mostly when we travel we can’t help but absorb some of the local culture and return home with a deeper understanding of another way of life.

Advertisement

Greenwald himself now acknowledges the limits of travel boycotts, telling Radio National that it is “very, very difficult to be effective” because boycotts have to be widespread, and even then they’re not always guaranteed to have an economic or political impact.

And then I’m back to my trip to Iran where I learned so much about that country’s rich culture and history. Where I ate a raw onion like an apple after a meal of kebab and rice to “balance” the meal. Where I listened to Haafez’s poetry recited in Persian and felt I understood what it meant. Where I was apologised to every day for the burden of having to wear the hijab (mostly by men). Where I was invited to stay in a stranger’s home because I happened to be sitting next to her on the bus. Where I cried in response to a stranger’s kindness and then had my visa renewal disapproved because a member of the tourist police decided it wasn’t safe for a young woman (I was 34) to travel alone. Every culture contains deep contradictions.

How can we ever truly begin to understand each other if we don’t go where we fear, or we only travel to places that have policies we like? What a sad and lonely world that would be.

Reply
 
# 13 : Wednesday 17-5-2017 @ 10:42
 
 
Great article. I agree, a country having a death penalty or any law you disagree with is a tepid excuse not to visit it.
Reply
 
# 14 : Wednesday 17-5-2017 @ 11:03
 
 
Someone said :
Weren't you in Mali before they got rid of their death penalty?

Was this to Ozren or to me?
Reply
 
# 15 : Wednesday 17-5-2017 @ 12:07
 
 
Well Oxren since he's the one with the death penalty argument.
Reply
 
Prev 12Next