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The George And Hearing Damage
 
# 1 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 15:44
 
 
Hi does anyone think they have tinnitus or hearing damage from going to the George? I went there a few dozen times around 2006-7 and I've been paying for it ever since. I wish I never set foot in the place . They should really have signs up warning people how dangerous the volume of the music is at these clubs. I wish I'd have known to wear earplugs but no one did back then so I just didn't think of it. My tinnitus and mild hearing loss really have me depressed.
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# 2 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 19:42
 
 
Someone said :
Hi does anyone think they have tinnitus or hearing damage from going to the George? I went there a few dozen times around 2006-7 and I've been paying for it ever since. I wish I never set foot in the place . They should really have signs up warning people how dangerous the volume of the music is at these clubs. I wish I'd have known to wear earplugs but no one did back then so I just didn't think of it. My tinnitus and mild hearing loss really have me depressed.

Sorry to hear that you hearing has been impaired, but they cannot really be taking all the blame.

I remember that in the 80's, as kids, we were fully aware of the risks of loud sounds, and advised not to stay close to speakers at clubs, not to use earphones too loud when listening to our Walkman Personal Stereos, etc.

There has been some legislation around excessive noise since 1992.

In 2001, the HSE was checking sound levels in nightclubs (and finding they were too loud):
http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/more-than-half-nightclubs-ex etc ...

It is a pity that at that time, not many people paid attention to the common sense guidelines.
I asked 3 people who were in secondary school in the early 90's, and they talked about it in biology class. And they had heard about it from their parents and a it in primary school in the late 80's.

So it is regrettable, but like tobacco or sugar or electromagnetic waves, a lot of people did find it inconvenient to listen to that advice at the time...

If there had been a warning in those clubs, do you think you would have heeded them, and put earplugs? Not if everyone else felt it was daft...

More stuff from the early '00:
- 2002: http://www.irishtimes.com/business/new-guidelines-on-noise-pollut etc ...
- 2002, with comments about your own situation: http://www.irishhealth.com/article.html?id=3496
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# 3 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 21:33
 
 
I'm curious how you're 66 if you were a kid in the 80's. I believe all these places have noise limiters now which they didn't have then. They should have had them in much sooner given the evidence you refered to proving they knew about this for years. The Government knew this would create a problem but sat on their hands for too long content that people were out spending money. The legislation clearly wasn't being applied at bars and clubs. There must be a lot of hearing impaired bar staff out there. I never even used headphones or stood close to speakers but in a club you have no control over the volume and no way to measure it( No sound measuring apps around 2006). People choose to drink or smoke too much and this can be as a result of an addiction. Going to bars and clubs is pretty much all there is to do for young people at the weekend and social pressures force them to go into these places without thinking how dangerous they really are. I know lots of very smart professional people who never gave a thought to the volume of music at the social venues they went to. I don't recall anyone ever bringing it up in conversation when they were on a night out. I never seen anyone wear ear plugs or would even thought of wearing them myself then. I didn't even know earplugs for nightclubs existed then. I certainly never seen them in any shop back then. I wasn't doing anything different to most 20-30 year olds by going into a club at the weekend without a set of earplugs in my pocket.I really didn't go to clubs that much and have never been to a single concert. I definitly would have worn earplugs if they were available at these clubs and they had clear signs advising to wear them. I wasn't on the internet around 2006-7 so I wouldn't have been looking these things up. There was no public awareness campaign I was aware of around then to inform the public about the danger at clubs and bars. I don't think it's fair to expect drunk people to take all the responsibilty to protect their hearing at clubs. The volume should have been turned down if it was so loud it would damage peoples hearing very quickly. That's been done now for a number of years but a little too late for me. I don't blame myself at all because I know my hearing troubles are down to 1 very bad incident when an imbecile DJ almost blew his speakers and I couldn't plug me ears in time as I was holding a drink. That was the DJs fault and also a failure of proper health and safety laws in place at the time. I knew loud music can damage your hearing over time but I don't think a few dozen visits to a club should cause serious damage to a persons hearing for the rest of their life. My older sister has been to clubs probably over 1000 times since she was a teen and she doesn't have any hearing problems. It just confirms to me how damaging the incident I had was and the George definitly caused damage too. I see Derek Mooney has tinnitus too and he went to the George also. There are going to be a lot of gay people from my generation with hearing problems from the George. I feel let down by poor health and safety laws which caused my hearing problems. I wasn't being irresponsible, I was just going out to socialise like everyone else. I just went to the wrong place.
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# 4 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 21:39
 
 
There are going to be a lot of people, gay or otherwise, who have or will have hearing issues, from loud music they chose to immerse themselves in. From our generation, and from the next one, and from the current one, and from the future ones... because they do not care to protect themselves as advised.

People going to loud clubs do not really care about saving for a pension or protecting their hearing, even when they know about the effects...

People going to raves do not take ear-defenders, and would find signage about the risk of loud music laughable: they are there for the loud music.

(I do not believe in providing accurate personal information unless it is relevant, thus the fake age of 66. If I was pretending to be 21, that would be seen as trying to deceive people... but I think I am safe the other way round)

Technically it puts me in breach of Gaire's T&C ("By using Gaire, you represent and warrant that (a) all registration information you submit is truthful and accurate;[...]")
But as I am not a frog with flies coming out of his labyrinthic ass, nor am I from or in the Danish city of Odder, and nor am I really "feeling secretive" today, nor am I identifying as male, nor am I called blaH...


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# 5 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 22:20
 
 
As I said, clubs have noise limiters now to reduce the risk of hearing damage which increases rapidly above certain decibel levels. If it had been done sooner it would have saved a lot of trouble. Patrons at clubs didn't choose the volume level and would probably prefered it to be lower judging from the comments on http://www.irishhealth.com/article.html?id=3496
I know lots of people who started their pensions in their mid 20s while they still went clubbing at the weeekend. There were no signs advising patrons at clubs how dangerous they were. Aren't there warnings on cigarettes, etc. If I walk into a shopping centre and the roof collapses breaking my legs I would have expected the building to be safe. Bars and clubs should been a safe place too for people to socialise but they clearly weren't and not enough was done to ensure public safety. If the music was so dangerously loud it shouldn't have been allowed. A small reduction in the db level would have made the George a safer place when I went there but I had no way to measure it at the time.
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# 6 : Thursday 22-6-2017 @ 22:38
 
 
Someone said :
As I said, clubs have noise limiters now to reduce the risk of hearing damage which increases rapidly above certain decibel levels. If it had been done sooner it would have saved a lot of trouble. Patrons at clubs didn't choose the volume level and would probably prefered it to be lower judging from the comments on http://www.irishhealth.com/article.html?id=3496
I know lots of people who started their pensions in their mid 20s while they still went clubbing at the weeekend. There were no signs advising patrons at clubs how dangerous they were. Aren't there warnings on cigarettes, etc. If I walk into a shopping centre and the roof collapses breaking my legs I would have expected the building to be safe. Bars and clubs should been a safe place too for people to socialise but they clearly weren't and not enough was done to ensure public safety. If the music was so dangerously loud it shouldn't have been allowed. A small reduction in the db level would have made the George a safer place when I went there but I had no way to measure it at the time.

I am puzzled as to why you're singling out The George for rhis? I would imagine the volume is the same in the majority of nightclubs and even louder at live gigs.
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# 7 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 11:07
 
 
I very badly damaged my hearing and developed tinnitus for life when I was 19 and fell asleep beside a speaker in Fibber McGees heavy rock bar in Dublin in early 1994. The tinnitus was absolute hell at the time and it took a course to Valium to help deal with the loud, constant ringing in my ears.

I generally bring earplugs to loud venues these days. Usually works.

I agree that bars and clubs play their music far too loud. It's sad when you can't even talk to another person in a bar because the music's too loud.
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# 8 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 11:27
 
 
Anyone thinking of getting ear plugs I recommend these from Alpine:



They're very comfortable and discreet and best of all they lower the volume without affecting sound quality much, unlike regular foam plugs which make everything sound muffled.


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# 9 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 12:50
 
 
Someone said :
Hi does anyone think they have tinnitus or hearing damage from going to the George? I went there a few dozen times around 2006-7 and I've been paying for it ever since. I wish I never set foot in the place . They should really have signs up warning people how dangerous the volume of the music is at these clubs. I wish I'd have known to wear earplugs but no one did back then so I just didn't think of it. My tinnitus and mild hearing loss really have me depressed.

You're statute barred if it's a claim you are looking for. So, was the George the only place you visited that had music between 2006/07. From a legal point of view you're publishing this accusation could be construed by the Courts as "defamation".
Moderators, please consider the exposure in this thread.
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# 10 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:03
 
 
Someone said :

You're statute barred if it's a claim you are looking for.

Unfortunately, because of the claim culture in this country, that's the first thing I thought OP was angling for.
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# 11 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:27
 
 
Someone said :

You're statute barred if it's a claim you are looking for. So, was the George the only place you visited that had music between 2006/07. From a legal point of view you're publishing this accusation could be construed by the Courts as "defamation".
Moderators, please consider the exposure in this thread.

That's a ridiculously OTT response to the original post. The OP was stating that he got hearing damage from loud music in a particular establishment. I did like wise. Does that leave our posts open to defamation proceedings? I think not. Come on!!
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# 12 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:32
 
 
Someone said :

That's a ridiculously OTT response to the original post. The OP was stating that he got hearing damage from loud music in a particular establishment. I did like wise. Does that leave our posts open to defamation proceedings? I think not. Come on!!

As a lawyer I fear it might. Even re-tweeting a quote and response on twitter can land you in it.

http://qz.com/29052/want-to-face-a-libel-suit-just-hit-retweet/
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# 13 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:46
 
 
Well then let's just shut down all message boards and Twitter, FB etc as I'm sure tens of millions of people are open to lawsuits.

This sort of BS helps no-one but lawyers seeking to enrich themselves further. Ireland is already litigious enough without people trying to frighten others that a post on Gaire is a potential law suit.
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# 14 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:48
 
 
law suit my hole!

when did everyone turn into idiots, get real people!
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# 15 : Friday 23-6-2017 @ 13:59
 
 
Someone said :
Well then let's just shut down Twitter, FB etc

Awesome idea
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